Clivia in Spring

For the Clivia enthusiast, is there ever a more exciting time than spring?

It is interesting that the seasons are so different each year. I remember last year that I had dozens of plants in the house to try to encourage the flower spikes to rise faster than they normally would so I could display the plant at the Clivia Expo. However this year, I worry that many flowers will be past their prime by the time the Expo rolls around and only have 3 plants in my house. The only reason I have these 3 plants in my house where it is warm is because either the flower bud has not developed at all in the past few weeks and appears to be stuck down low, or in one case, it looks like the buds will open while still down between the leaves.

Of course being in pots makes it easy for me to bring them into the house. If they are garden plants then there is not much you can do except keep an eye on any buds that appear stuck down in the leaves or are opening down in the leaves, as rot can set in and damage/kill the plant. I have at times, use clothes pegs to force the leaves open so more air will circulate around the stuck flower. Sprinkling Sulphur Powder down around the stuck buds may assist with eliminating rot, or worst case, you may have to cut the stuck buds or stuck flowers out with a knife, and then sprinkle Sulphur Powder on the open wounds.

Hopefully none of that will happen and you will have tons of stems elongating full of flower buds. I tend to bring all my flowering plants up to the house so I can look at them all the time. I can keep a check on how the stems are elongating, clean the leaves so they will look good for photography after the flowers open, fertilise them, and generally just stare at them and daydream of what the first flowering plants may turn out like.

At this time of the year (early September), I am starting my spraying regime for the year. Although mealy bug is not a huge problem over winter due to the colder environment, small pockets of the little blighters may have survived and will thrive once the warmer weather arrives. I spray all the plants again to hopefully knock them off at this early stage.

My plants have not been watered very often over winter so I have just recently gone through and given them all a good drink. Already I can see that the great majority of plants have new leaves so have started their growing cycle for the year. It is the perfect time to water and fertilise them. My plants have a 12 month slow-release fertiliser in their pot already, but I have gone through and given them a slightly diluted liquid fertiliser, in this case, I used Aquasol.

This is also a good time to look for potential problems. Any plant that does not have new leaves, I have to wonder why. I squeeze the base of the plant to test it is solid. A plant that has rotted through the middle will be spongey when squeezed. A plant that I am sure has rotted through the middle, I will pull off all the leaves, or cut through them with a knife, so the base is left with the roots. If the roots are healthy and there is enough good material left in the base, then eventually this stump may grow offsets. Plants try very hard to survive and will produce offsets when they know they are sick or dying. If I do not think there is rot in the middle and I am sure the roots are ok, and yet the plant has not produced new leaves, I sprinkle Sulphur Powder down between the leaves (just in case), give the plant a good fertilisation and then keep an eye on it to try to diagnose what is wrong.

A few downfalls with bringing a plant into a warm house are that the darker house will result in a more washed out colour on the flower. Even if it is situated in front of a sunny window, I find the flower colour is not completely accurate if the plant has been in a warm house. Also if the flower generally has a green throat or green tips to the petals, this may be reduced by being housed in a warm environment. Green likes the cold.

Enjoy your budding plants as it is a long time until next spring.

Fertilising Clivia

Clivia love fertiliser. Fertilising your plant will result in darker green leaves, more growth, a better root system and better flowers. I have often seen plants in need of a good fertilising and the leaves have taken on a more lime green colour. Nothing looks better than a healthy plant with dark green leaves and new leaves developing.

I use a slow release fertiliser that lasts for 12 months on my plants. A small amount is mixed throughout the potting medium and a handful is sprinkled around the top of the pot. I also give my plants a liquid fertiliser once per month. These are plants in pots. Plants in the garden would also benefit from a slow release fertiliser and the occasional watering can of liquid fertiliser.

The following fertilisers are the most popular ones used at present. There are many more good fertilisers not listed here but I have not had experience with the others.

Seasol

Seasol is not a fertiliser. It is more of a tonic. I find it great to give to a stressed plant or when I have just repotted a plant. I use it on plants that seem to have a problem or have dried out too much. It is reported to be good for root growth. I use it diluted in water and watering it in with a watering can.

Aquasol (No longer available)

I find Aquasol a great liquid fertiliser. I give it to my mature plants and a diluted version to my seedlings. I sometimes use it as a foliar spray and sometimes in a watering can.

Charlie Carp

Charlie Carp is a very smelly liquid fertiliser. I have heard some experts say that it is not as good as others such as Aquasol due to the carp living in fresh water and not sea water. I have used Charlie Carp extensively and find it great, however be aware you will need a shower afterwards. I also like the thought that we are helping to get rid of the carp in our rivers.

Thrive

Thrive is also a great fertiliser. I find that it is great for the growth of the leaves and not so much for inducing flowering. I use it at times on my seedlings.

Osmocote

I love Osmocote but to buy it in the quantity I need, it is too expensive. There is a similar product available called Multicote which has the same properties as Osmocote and is a great slow release fertiliser. The one I use lasts for 12 months.

Powerfeed

This product is made by the same company as Seasol. I use this on my young seedlings as I find it is not too strong and encourages growth. I use this as a foliar spray.

Seamungus

This product I also use on seedlings. It comes in a pellet form or a crumble form. I find this not too strong and very good for the young plants.